Blog: From the Road

Meandering by Homer

Feel free to read, to laugh with me, to cry when appropriate, and to, as Lil’ Abner (whom I quote often) says  “angrify” if it fits.

Men for My Rivers – Part Two

By Homer Hirt

The first cargo to be shipped out of the new Jackson County Port near Sneads, Florida, was a barge-load of crushed automobiles. Full sized autos were flattened in a hydraulic machine and were stacked by the large American crane into the open hopper barges.  The stacks were well above the gunwales of the barges, towering another six to eight feet, and secured with steel cables.  0ne day we stood on the pier and watched as from downstream a push boat, propelled by a huge stern wheel and seemingly from out of the past, slowly made the turn at the Gulf Power plant, and then turned again and approached the pier from upstream. The deckhand scrambled to rig wires to the first barge, and to tighten them with winches so that the boat and the barge was as one.  Then up the ladder came the Captain. (more…)



Important Addition to Torreya State Park Acquired

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 15, 2018

CONTACT: DEP Press Office, 850.245.2112DEPNews@dep.state.fl.us

Important Addition to Torreya State Park Acquired

~The park harbors many rare and native animals and plants
such as the nearly extinct Florida torreya tree~

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recently purchased a 65-acre addition to Torreya State Park in Jackson County. Torreya State Park is adjacent to the Apalachicola River Florida Forever project, which includes much of Florida’s upland glades natural community, currently not represented on conservation lands, and harbors several globally rare plant species as well as 16 species that occur nowhere else in Florida. (more…)


Meandering by Homer

Feel free to read, to laugh with me, to cry when appropriate, and to, as Lil’ Abner (whom I quote often) says “angrify” if it fits.

Men for My Rivers – Part One

By Homer Hirt

“There was but one abiding ambition, and that was to leave home, and return…… as a river pilot” (Mark Twain)

Several years ago I went out to the Mount Pleasant cemetery near Chattahoochee for a graveside service. I stood about fifty feet back from the crowd, close enough to hear but far enough away to observe.

I felt something under my feet, and I looked down. Half-hidden by the centipede grass runners was a narrow marker with a name and a death date, and nothing more. I carefully scrubbed the grass back with the toe of my boot.

Here was the final resting place for Sam Cameron, although I am not certain that his spirit will ever rest while the Apalachicola, Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers continue their run to the sea. (more…)